News

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Giant Steam Generators to be Moved from Maryland to TMI

 

510-pound parts for refurbishing again plant

 

 

By P.J. Reilly

Staff Writer, Lancaster Newspapers

 

State, county and municipal officials are making preparations now for the "monumental" journey of two gigantic, 510-ton steam generators, which will travel the length of Lancaster County as they move from Maryland to Three Mile Island.

To accommodate the generators, which are 70 feet long and 13 feet tall, temporary bridge bypasses must be built, overhead utility wires, trees and traffic signals must either be moved or removed and roads must be closed to all traffic.

"It will be an event unlike anything we've seen in my lifetime, as far as moving something goes," said Barry Smith, Manor Township's manager. "I've seen them move houses, and I thought that was pretty cool.

"But this apparently is going to be staggering."

Cost of Nuclear Plant Climbs - Cash Shortfall for Cleanup

 Rutland Herald

April 3, 2009

Entergy doesn't have cash in fund to clean up Vernon nuclear plant site.
By Susan Smallheer STAFF WRITER
BRATTLEBORO - The cost of decommissioning the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant has gone up $25 million in the past year, at the same time its savings account to cover the costs of dismantlement and cleanup has declined about $93 million.

But according to a filing with the NRC this week, Entergy Nuclear has no plans of making any new contributions to the decommissioning trust fund, sidestepping the issue of the recent declines in the trust fund because of the economic crisis.
 

Aging plant springs radioactive leak

 

NRC details latest nuclear plant leak

Rutland Herald

NRC Decision Clears Way for Oyster Creek Nuclear Plant Renewal

April 1, 2009 

By Ben Leach

 

The Oyster Creek Generating Station in Lacey Township, Ocean County, is expected to receive a license to operate for another 20 years by next Thursday.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission voted 3-1 at a Wednesday hearing to reject arguments from a coalition of citizens groups that the nuclear plant is unsafe to operate beyond 2009.

As far as the NRC is concerned, the hearing process is over and it will move forward with issuing a renewed license, said Neil Sheehan, a spokesman for the NRC.

TMI Alert, nuclear industry advocate face off

Three Mile Island Alert Chairman Eric Epstein faces off with Nuclear Energy Institute vice president of communications Scott Peterson in a video debate on the state of the nuclear industry. 

The discussion between Epstein and Peterson is moderated by Susan McGinnis of CleanSkies TV, and follows a news presentation of what happened at Three Mile Island's Unit 2 reactor on March 28, 1979. 

Epstein emphasizes the unanswered questions haunting the nuclear industry: What to do with the waste, where to find the water to run the plants, and why private investment won't support the industry. Industry advocate Peterson calls the 1979 accident a "controlled release" of radiation and insists the market will support industry growth. 

To view the program, go to: 

 www.cleanskies.tv/#

Find the link button to CleanSkies Sunday and then click on the video program on Three Mile Island. 

France to Compensate Victims of Nuclear Tests

 PARIS – The French government offered for the first time Tuesday to compensate victims of nuclear tests in Algeria and the South Pacific, bowing to decades of pressure by people sickened by radiation — and seeking to soothe France's conscience. "It's time for our country to be at peace with itself, at peace thanks to a system of compensation and reparations," French Defense Minister Herve Morin said in presenting a draft law on the payouts.

TIME Magazine on TMI at 30: Nuclear Power's Pitfalls

 Friday, Mar. 27, 2009

Three Mile Island at 30: Nuclear Power's Pitfalls

By Michael Grunwald

 

If the Three Mile Island atomic reactor near Harrisburg hadn't melted down 30 years ago this Saturday...well, there probably would have been an accident somewhere else. The entire U.S. nuclear industry was melting down in the 1970s, irradiated by spectacular cost overruns, interminable delays and public outrage. Forbes later called its collapse "the largest managerial disaster in business history, a disaster on a monumental scale."

The day we held our breath: Berks man looks back 30 years to his part in Three Mile Island calamity

Thirty years ago today, Temple resident Robert M. Dreibelbis Sr., a Met-Ed executive, was plunged into uncharted territory by the worst nuclear accident the U.S. had ever known.

By Jason Brudereck

Reading Eagle

 

Nearly four hours into the accident, Bob Dreibelbis was getting ready to leave his Temple home for work like any other day.

 

Then the phone rang.

 

Robert M. Dreibelbis Sr., purchasing manager for the electric utility Met-Ed, answered and found himself speaking to a Met-Ed engineering supervisor whose responsibilities included Three Mile Island.

 

It was 7:45 a.m. March 28, 1979, when the engineering supervisor called to tell Dreibelbis he had to quickly procure a helicopter to fly two men from the nuclear plant on an island three miles down river from Harrisburg because they had been exposed to radiation.

Video: TMI and Community Health

Accident Dose Assessments 

 

 

 

Nuclear engineer and long-time industry executive, Arnie Gundersen gives a talk on his calculations of the amount of radiation released during the accident at Three Mile Island.  Mr. Gundersen's calculations differ from those of the NRC's and official industry estimates.

 

Is Three Mile Island a Good Neighbor?

 

By Ad Crable, Lancater New Era 

 

The irony is that 30 years after the most infamous U.S. accident since the splitting of the atom, there is talk of a nuclear-power revival, driven by greenhouse-gas concerns.

 

A separate reality is that three decades after the iconic partial-meltdown at Three Mile Island, the nuclear plant's surviving Unit 1 reactor is almost assured of soon receiving government permission to continue operating through 2034.

 

Is that a good thing?

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