Public Interest Group Appeals South Carolina Public Service Commission Decision Approving Nuclear Reactors to State Supreme Court

 

Friends of the Earth Asserts Decision in Error and Not in the Public Interest

May 22, 2009

COLUMBIA, S.C. - The environmental organization Friends of the Earth has today filed an appeal with the South Carolina Supreme Court challenging the legality of a South Carolina Public Service Commission decision approving an application by South Carolina Electric & Gas to build two new nuclear reactors. The filing is believed to be a first national challenge to the type of state law which unjustly forces consumers to pay for nuclear projects in advance, no matter if they fail.

 

Nuclear Trash Fee 'Rebate' Would Be At Public's Risk

By Marlene Lang

 

We all know trash ain't cheap.  

Electricity users have long paid a "garbage fee" on that portion of their power produced by nuclear reactors – a fee of one tenth of a cent per kilowatt-hour. The pennies go into the Nuclear Waste Fund. Since the fund was set up in 1982, about $30 billion has accumulated. 

The money has gone unused as politicians and scientists debate what is the best the location for a national dump where the radioactive waste will rest for thousands of years. 

Congress in 2002 designated Yucca Mountain in Nevada as the nation's – and possibly, the world's – nuclear waste repository site. But not every one thought the desert outside of Las Vegas was such a great location. Then-governor of Nevada Kenny Quinn vetoed Congress and the power-volley continues. 

Obama cut Yucca Mountain out of the budget and in response, a group of Republicans has sponsored a bill that would give the Nuclear Waste Fund back to the utilities and customers, if Yucca is not built and soon. 

Students surveying nuclear plant communities

As part of a course in Engineering and Public Policy Carnegie Mellon, graduate student Katie Bastine and fellow students are gathering input from communities that are home to nuclear power plants. 

Three Mile Island Alert will post the results of the survey as they are made available.

To link to the survey web site, go to: www.epp.cmu.edu/httpdocs/undergraduate/summaries/Nuclear/index.html

 

Here is a response from the former editor of Middletown's hometown newspaper:

 

 1. As an outside observer, what is your impression of the nuclear power plant?

It scares me and I wonder when something will go wrong, and if  people will know about it, if and when it does. 

 

Hole Found in Containment Liner at Nuclear Plant, Board in Cement Blamed

Below are news reports on a hole found in the steel liner of a reactor containment wall; six days after the story was reported, the hole was attributed to a board embedded in the concrete containment wall. 

 

Beaver County Times

By Bill Vidonic, Times Staff

Friday, April 24, 2009 

SHIPPINGPORT — An inspection Thursday revealed corrosion in the steel lining of the nuclear reactor containment building of Beaver Valley Nuclear Power Station’s Unit 1, according to FirstEnergy Corp.
No radiation was released from the building, and there was “no impact to the public health or safety of any employees,” FirstEnergy spokesman Todd Schneider said Friday evening.
The Unit 1 reactor had been shut down since Monday for scheduled refueling and maintenance. As part of that work, Schneider said, the containment building that surrounds the reactor underwent a standard inspection.
The containment building has concrete walls that are 4 feet thick, Schneider said, and there’s a 3/8-inch-thick steel lining on top of that concrete in the building’s interior.
The steel is coated with what Schneider described as “nuclear-grade paint.” An inspection showed a blister in some of that coating. The blister wasn’t cracked, Schneider said.
Once the coating was cleaned, Schneider added, workers found that the steel underneath it had corroded through to the concrete wall. The affected area of the steel is in the shape of a rectangle, Schneider said, about one inch long by about 3/8-inch high. That’s just under the size of a standard paper clip.

Community Nursing Survey Focuses on Middletown, Emergency Response Plan

AND THE SURVEY SAYS…

Thank you to the 100 residents of Middletown who participated in a disaster preparedness survey we conducted in February at the local Karn’s and Giant grocery stores. A group of Penn State University Harrisburg nursing students enrolled in the RN-to-BSN program and whose studies focus on community nursing, chose to examine disaster preparedness in Middletown.

Investigation: Revelations about Three Mile Island disaster raise doubts over nuclear plant safety

A special Facing South investigation by Sue Sturgis

Thirty Years Later

On the 20th and 30th Anniversaries of the Exxon Valdez 

and Three Mile Island Accidents, Respectively, We Do 

Exelon CEO and industry representative argues for new nuclear plants

The nuclear power industry's top dog, in February 2008, explains

the industry's claims that construction of new nuclear power plants is necessary. 

 

"Good morning.  I am John Rowe.  Some of you may know me as 

Compost throwing incident mars NRC public hearing


 

High inspection marks anger resident, who says plant's performance is not deserving

Meet The Nuclear Power Lobby

By Diane Farsetta, Senior Researcher, Center for Media and Democracy. 

The following article appeared in the June 2008 issue of The Progressive magazine.

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