PUC Audit Shows PPL Electric Could Achieve Savings of up to $1.9 Million Annually

July 23, 2009

HARRISBURG – According to an audit report released today by the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission (PUC), PPL Electric Utilities Corp. (PPL) may realize yearly savings up to $1.9 million and one-time savings of $9.8 million by implementing recommendations contained in the audit.

The Commission voted 5-0 to make the audit report and the company’s implementation plan public.  The Focused Management and Operations Audit analyzed and evaluated management performance in 12 areas.  The audit was conducted by the PUC’s Bureau of Audits Staff.

The audit makes 23 recommendations to the company for improvement.  The company’s implementation plan accepted all 23 of the recommendations.

Public Input Hearing Scheduled for PPL Plan

The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission will have a hearing for public input concerning approval of and Energy Efficiency and Conservation Plan for PPL Electric Utilities, on July 30 at 6 p.m. in Bethlehem, Pa. at City Council Chambers. 

Exelon: Peach Bottom Station Environmental Monitoring Program Identifies Tritium On-site

 DELTA, PA (July 10, 2009) - Peach Bottom nuclear plant workers performing environmental 

monitoring this week identified tritium in a localized area on plant property.  The tritium was 

Testing finds elevated tritium at Peach Bottom

York Daily Record By BRENT BURKEY

July 10, 2009

Environmental monitoring at Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station has turned up levels of a radioactive form of hydrogen six times what the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says is acceptable.

But Peach Bottom maintains there is no public health threat or health threat to employees at the plant.

Stilp and Epstein discuss nuclear power issues with Patriot-News

TMI-Alert's Eric Epstein and nuclear activist Gene Stilp discuss, with the Patriot-News editorial board, nuclear power, electrical deregulation, alternative energy and their challenges to PPL's application to construct a new nuclear reactor at Bell Bend near Berwick, Pa. 




Nest Eggs for Nuclear Plant Close Downs Fall Short

By Marlene Lang 


Think you are the only one who can't manage to set aside a nest egg? Don't feel lonely. Your neighborhood nuclear power plant may be busily creating a remedial savings plan of its own. 

Twenty-six plants nationwide showed shortfalls in the funds they are required by federal law to set aside for dismantling the reactors someday and cleaning up after themselves. The closely watched Three Mile Island plant was not on the shortfall list. 

Every year the Nuclear Regulatory Commission checks on the state of so-called "decommissioning funds." Most years there are only a handful of plants running short of having those estimated costs laid up, usually four or five one official said. Those billions set aside for close-down and clean-up don't just pile up under a mattress, of course; the money is invested in the stock market. According to an Associated Press report, some $4.4 billion in decommissioning funds was lost in the downturn, even as the actual costs for shutting down plants has risen by $4.6 billion because of (I love this part) rising energy costs – and labor costs. 

NRC: Environmental Impact of TMI Will Be Small




The NRC license renewal staff has evaluation the environmental impacts related to

re-licensing the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit 1 reactor and has concluded that 

the effects would be "small," overall but that the cumulative effect over time would be

 "small to moderate" as related to aquatic resources. The June 29, 2009 memo is reproduced

here and attached below are related documents. 



MEMORANDUM TO: Brian E. Holian, Director 

Division of License Renewal 

Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation 


FROM: Sarah Lopas, Project Manager /RA/ 

Reactor Projects Branch 1 

Division of License Renewal 

Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation 




Study: Cost of New Reactors Huge, Requires Taxpayer Subsidies


Dr. Cooper said: "We are literally seeing nuclear reactor history repeat itself. The 'Great Bandwagon Market' that ended so badly for consumers in the1970s and1980s was driven by advocates who confused hope and hype with reality." The study finds that new reactor costs are now more than four times greater than original "renaissance" projections.

Funds to Shut Down Plants Fall Short

By Ad Crable

Staff Writer, Lancaster New Era

The economic downturn has caused funds set aside for the safe closure of the Three Mile Island and Peach Bottom nuclear plants to drop dramatically in the last two years.

Since 2007, estimates of dismantling costs at the nation's 104 nuclear plants have risen by more than $4.6 billion while the investment funds that are supposed to pay for the closures — or decommissioning as it's called — have dropped $4.4 billion, according to an investigation by the Associated Press.

According to decommissioning fund statements filed by Exelon Corp., owners of the two plants, the balance in the closure fund for Three Mile Island's Unit 1 dropped $69 million from 2007 to 2009.

For Peach Bottom, decommissioning funds dropped $64 million over the last two years for Unit 2 and nearly $70 million for the Unit 3 reactor.

The fund losses are tied to investments.

Is it a cause for concern?


NRC Relaxes Fitness-for-Duty Measures at Plants

June 8, 2009


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