Nuclear Regulatory Commission - News Release
No: 21-027 July 8, 2021
CONTACT: David McIntyre, 301-415-8200
 
NRC Begins Environmental Justice Review of Agency Programs
 
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is conducting a systematic review of how the agency’s programs, policies and activities address environmental justice. As part of the review, agency staff will seek public comment related to how the NRC addresses environmental justice, given its mission of protecting people and the environment.
 
“We anticipate that these meetings will invite a wide range of useful perspectives, from community groups, non-governmental organizations, labor unions, and nuclear power plant operators,” said NRC Chairman Christopher T. Hanson. “What we learn will help enhance the staff’s reviews of license applications and other activities that we regulate.”
 
The Commission directed the review in a staff requirements memorandum dated April 23, giving the staff nine months to conduct the review. An Environmental Justice Review Team has been established within the NRC Office of the Executive Director for Operations and has begun reviewing recent Executive Orders and assessing practices of other federal, state and tribal governments. The team will also review the adequacy of the NRC’s 2004 Policy Statement on the Treatment of Environmental Justice Matters in NRC Regulatory and Licensing Actions. The team will evaluate whether the NRC should incorporate environmental justice beyond implementation through the National Environmental Policy Act, as set out in the policy statement, and consider whether there may be benefits from establishing formal mechanisms to gather external stakeholder input.
 
The Environmental Justice Review Team will hold two public meetings by webinar July 15 to provide an overview of its review and receive public comment. The webinars will be held from 1:30-3p.m. and 8-9:30p.m., both Eastern Time. Details for accessing the webinars are available in the public meetings notices linked above.
 
A notice will be published on July 9 in the Federal Register asking specific questions to inform the team’s review and describing other means to provide public comment.
 
COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA
Dept. of Environmental Protection

Commonwealth News Bureau
Room 308, Main Capitol Building
Harrisburg PA., 17120

 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
07/8/2021
 
CONTACT:
Jamar Thrasher, DEP
717-787-1323

 
ADVISORY – JULY 13 – HARRISBURG – Environmental Quality Board to Consider Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative Final Regulation

 
Harrisburg, PA – The Pennsylvania Environmental Quality Board will hold a meeting on Tuesday July 13, 2021 to consider the final form rulemaking for Pennsylvania to take part in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI). The meeting will be held at 9:00 AM and will be streamed at pacast.com/live/dep. The Rachel Carson State Office Building remains closed to the public.
 
The final RGGI regulation takes into account the thousands of comments received across 10 virtual public hearings and 60 day comment period. The final version of the regulation, along with supporting documents, can be found at dep.pa.gov/rggi under “Consideration of Final Rulemaking: CO2 Budget Trading Program (25 Pa. Code Chapter 145).”
 
Benefits of the regulation, if enacted, include:
• Less air pollution – RGGI would eliminate more than 188 million tons of carbon pollution over 10 years
• Improved health by preventing $6.3 billion of health care costs due to cleaner air
• Up to 30,000 new jobs created and an increase in Gross State Product by $2 billion
 
More information about RGGI and Pennsylvania can be found at dep.pa.gov/rggi
 
WHAT: Environmental Quality Board Meeting
WHEN: Tuesday, July 13, 2021, at 9:00 AM
WHERE: Streaming at pacast.com/live/dep
Sen. Heinrich & Lujan, new Rep. Melanie Stansbury, and Gov. Lujan Grisham to DOE Secretary Granholm:
We are strongly opposed to the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW) in New Mexico.
 
Letter attached.
 
New post on Los Alamos Reporter
CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATION NEWS
 
U.S. Senators Martin Heinrich and Ben Ray Luján, and U.S. Representative Melanie Stansbury and New Mexico Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham sent a letter to U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm opposing the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW) in New Mexico.
 
“We are strongly opposed to the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW) in New Mexico.  There is currently no permanent disposal strategy for SNF and HLW in place at the Department of Energy.  This leaves us extremely concerned that ‘interim’ storage sites with initial 40-year leases, like one proposed for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing in New Mexico, will become the country’s de facto permanent nuclear waste storage facilities.  We cannot accept that result,” they wrote.
 
There are currently two pending applications before the NRC for licenses to construct and operate consolidated interim storage facilities (CISFs) - one in Andrews, Texas, and one in Lea County, New Mexico. 
 
“Without a strategy in place at the Department of Energy for permanent waste disposal, any CISF constructed in or near New Mexico could become a waste storage site that is, in essence, permanent.  New Mexico has not and will not consent to such a situation,” they continued.
 
The New Mexico lawmakers cautioned that, “We cannot repeat such harms by establishing interim nuclear waste storage sites, especially without a permanent waste disposal strategy.  We would welcome collaborative work to establish a coherent, consent-based federal policy on managing and disposing of SNF and HLW, and look forward to engaging in that work with you.”  
 
Last month, Senator Heinrich raised his concerns about interim storage directly with Secretary Granholm during a Senate Energy and Natural Resources hearing to review the President’s Fiscal Year 2022 budget request for the U.S. Department of Energy.
 
The full text of the letter is available here and below:
 
Dear Secretary Granholm,
 
We are strongly opposed to the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW) in New Mexico.  There is currently no permanent disposal strategy for SNF and HLW in place at the Department of Energy.  This leaves us extremely concerned that “interim” storage sites with initial 40-year leases, like one proposed for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing in New Mexico, will become the country’s de facto permanent nuclear waste storage facilities.  We cannot accept that result.  
 
As you have recognized, the consent of those affected is a critical component of any approach to nuclear waste storage.  There are currently two pending applications before the NRC for licenses to construct and operate consolidated interim storage facilities (CISFs) - one in Andrews, Texas, and one in Lea County, New Mexico.  Without a strategy in place at the Department of Energy for permanent waste disposal, any CISF constructed in or near New Mexico could become a waste storage site that is, in essence, permanent.  New Mexico has not and will not consent to such a situation. 
 
New Mexico is proud to host Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.  The people of New Mexico have long been at the forefront of our national security mission and the discovery of nuclear science and technologies.  Unfortunately, in some cases, this has resulted in situations that have harmed the health and wellbeing of New Mexicans. We cannot repeat such harms by establishing interim nuclear waste storage sites, especially without a permanent waste disposal strategy.  We would welcome collaborative work to establish a coherent, consent-based federal policy on managing and disposing of SNF and HLW, and look forward to engaging in that work with you.  

 

Subject:  BRAIDWOOD STATION, UNITS 1 AND 2; BYRON STATION, UNIT NOS. 1 AND 2; CALVERT CLIFFS NUCLEAR POWER PLANT, UNITS 1 AND 2; CLINTON POWER STATION, UNIT NO. 1; DRESDEN NUCLEAR POWER STATION, UNITS 2 AND 3; JAMES A. FITZPATRICK NUCLEAR POWER PLANT; LASALLE COUNTY STATION, UNITS 1 AND 2; LIMERICK GENERATING STATION, UNITS 1 AND 2; NINE MILE POINT NUCLEAR STATION, UNITS 1 AND 2; PEACH BOTTOM ATOMIC POWER STATION, UNITS 2 AND 3; QUAD CITIES NUCLEAR POWER STATION, UNITS 1 AND 2; AND R. E. GINNA NUCLEAR POWER PLANT — PROPOSED ALTERNATIVE TO EXPAND THE USE OF ASME CODE CASES N-878 AND N-880 TO CARBON STEEL PIPING (EPIDS L-2021-LLR-0000, -0002, AND -0003)
 
ADAMS Accession No: ML21166A168
 
Subject: Three Mile Island: Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station – Unit 1 –Security Decommissioning Inspection Report 05000289/2021401

ADAMS Accession No: ML21179A252
 

Subject:  Braidwood, Byron, Calvert Cliffs, Clinton, Dresden, FitzPatrick, LaSalle, Limerick, Nine Mile, Peach Bottom, Quad Cities, and Ginna - Summary of May 18, 2021, Meeting with Exelon Generation Company, LLC Regarding its Requested Alternative to Eliminate Certain Documentation Requirements for the Replacement of Pressure Retaining Bolting
 
ADAMS Accession No.:  ML21139A185
 
Nuclear Regulatory Commission - News Release
No: 21-021 June 4, 2021
CONTACT: David McIntyre, 301-415-8200
 
NRC Amends Licensing, Inspection, and Annual Fees for FY 2021
 
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is amending its regulations for the licensing, inspection, special projects, and annual fees it will charge applicants and licensees for FY 2021.
 
The FY 2021 final fee rule, published today in the Federal Register, includes fees required by the Nuclear Energy Innovation and Modernization Act to recover, to the maximum extent practicable, approximately 100 percent of the agency’s total budget authority in FY 2021, less the budget authority for certain excluded activities. NEIMA also established a new cap for the annual fees charged to operating reactor licensees and required three sets of actions related to NRC invoices for service fees. A proposed rule was published for public comment on Feb. 22.
 
The final fee rule reflects a total budget authority of $844.4 million, a decrease of $11.2 million from FY 2020. After accounting for exclusions from the fee-recovery requirement and net billing adjustments, the NRC must recover approximately $708 million in fees in FY 2021. Of this amount, approximately $190.6 million will be recovered under Part 170 fees for service and $517.4 million will be recovered through Part 171 annual fees.
 
Compared to FY 2020, annual fees are decreasing for fuel facilities, non-power production or utilization facilities, 42 materials users fee categories, uranium recovery activities, and for the U.S. Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Program. Annual fees are increasing for spent fuel storage/reactor decommissioning activities, operating power reactors, DOE transportation activities, and 11 materials users fee categories. While the operating power reactors’ annual fee is increasing in FY 2021, it does not exceed the cap established by NEIMA. Generally, annual fees are impacted by changes to the budget, fees for services, the number of licensees, the results of the biennial review of fees, and other factors.
 
The FY 2021 final fee rule also includes a change in the hourly rate, affecting licensees and applicants. The NRC has increased the hourly rate from $279 to $288 for FY 2021 and has adjusted license application fees accordingly.
 
The NRC estimates that the FY 2021 annual fees will be paid by the 93 licensees of operating commercial power reactors, four non-power production or utilization facilities, 122 spent nuclear fuel storage and decommissioning reactor facilities, eight fuel cycle facilities, one uranium recovery facility, and approximately 2,500 nuclear materials licensees.
Subject: SUSQUEHANNA STEAM ELECTRIC STATION, UNITS 1 AND 2 – REGULATORY AUDIT PLAN IN SUPPORT OF LICENSE AMENDMENT REQUEST TO REVISE TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS TO ADOPT RISKINFORMED COMPLETION TIMES (EPID L-2021-LLA-0062)
 

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